September 28, 2021

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Observance of International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

11 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Around the world, violence against women harms not only millions of women and girls every year, but also their communities and families.  Violence against women, whether in the workforce, the home, a school environment, or as a result of conflict or crisis, is never acceptable.  The United States recognizes the inherent dignity that every woman and girl possesses and is committed to preventing and responding to violence against women.

Every woman and girl deserves to live a life free from violence.  Eliminating violence against women removes significant barriers to women’s empowerment, enabling them to become trailblazers, innovators, and leaders in their communities.  These efforts require the dedication of governments, the private sector, and civil society to create an enduring impact.  The United States is proud to observe the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women on November 25 and the accompanying 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence.

The United States recognizes that the COVID-19 pandemic has uniquely and disproportionately impacted women – from increased rates of violence against women to increased employment insecurity.  It is time for the international community to come together to end violence against women, stand with and empower survivors, and emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic stronger than ever before.  The United States is committed to doing so for the sake of national security, global prosperity, and the rights and dignity of women and girls worldwide.

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