September 22, 2021

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North Macedonia National Day

9 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of North Macedonia as you celebrate 30 years of independence.

We proudly welcomed North Macedonia as the 30th NATO Ally last year, a testament to your country’s firm dedication to regional and global peace and security.  Your participation in Alliance missions, including in Afghanistan, reflect your dedication and commitment to shared values.

The United States stands with you as you continue to make great strides toward increasing the prosperity of all your citizens, improving the rule of law, and strengthening your democratic institutions.  North Macedonia also has our unwavering support as it works to realize its aspirations to join the European Union.

Best wishes on this special day.

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