New York Man Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to File False Returns

A resident of Newburgh, New York, pleaded guilty today to conspiracy to defraud the United States, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.

According to the indictment, Jose Andreu filed false tax returns with the assistance of a return preparer. From 2011 through 2019, Andreu and others prepared and filed false returns through two tax preparation firms that reported significant tax withholdings based on fictitious Forms 1099-OID, in an effort to fraudulently obtain refunds from the IRS. The Forms 1099-OID falsely reported that financial institutions, creditors, and other entities had withheld federal income tax, when in reality no such taxes had been withheld. Andreu also filed false returns for himself and others, claiming more than $2,125,872 in refunds from the IRS.

U.S. District Judge Eric R. Komitee scheduled sentencing for Feb. 24, 2021. Andreu faces up to five years in prison, as well as monetary penalties. As part of his plea agreement, Andreu has agreed to pay restitution to the IRS.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman thanked special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation and Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, who conducted the investigation, and Trial Attorneys Ann Marie Cherry and Mark Kotila of the Tax Division, who are prosecuting the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the Division’s website.

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Research has yielded a range of estimates of the number of servicemembers with an eating disorder, due to differences in research methods. For example, a 2018 DOD study concluded that servicemembers likely experienced eating disorders at rates that are comparable to rates in the general population, while other survey-based research suggested the number of servicemembers with eating disorders may be higher than those with a medical diagnoses of such disorders. The potential effects that eating disorders can have on the health and combat readiness of servicemembers and their dependents underscores the importance of screening and treating this population. GAO was asked to provide information on eating disorders among servicemembers and their dependents. To describe how DOD screens for eating disorders among servicemembers, GAO reviewed DOD policies related to health screening and interviewed behavioral health specialists from the military branches. To understand approaches and challenges with implementing screening in a military environment, any planned or ongoing DOD-sponsored research related to this topic, and available eating disorder treatment, GAO interviewed representatives from the Eating Disorder Coalition, Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, and the University of Kansas. To describe how DOD provides eating disorder treatment to servicemembers and their dependents, GAO interviewed DHA officials and TRICARE contractors and reviewed the TRICARE policy manual to identify the types of eating disorder diagnoses and treatments that are covered through direct and purchased care. GAO received data from the two TRICARE contractors related to the availability of eating disorder treatment services as of spring 2020. For more information, contact Sharon Silas at (202) 512-7114 or Silass@gao.gov.
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