September 27, 2021

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National Day of the Federated States of Micronesia

11 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I would like to congratulate the people of the Federated States of Micronesia in recognition of its 34th anniversary of independence on November 3.

Our two countries enjoy a warm friendship, strengthened by our cooperation in advancing our shared vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific with other democracies in the region.  Our people continue to enjoy close ties, and we recognize the service and sacrifice of many citizens of the Federated States of Micronesia in the United States Armed Forces.  Their service helps preserve global peace, security, and stability.  As we overcome the challenges of 2020, we are confident that our shared commitment to security and prosperity will further strengthen our bonds.

As a close friend and partner, we wish all citizens of the Federated States of Micronesia a peaceful and prosperous year.

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