Namibian Independence Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States, I offer congratulations to all Namibians on the 31st anniversary of your country’s independence.

Namibia and the United States share an enduring partnership grounded in our common democratic values and commitment to the rule of law.  Our mutual efforts ensure freedom, security, and health for both our peoples.  Against the backdrop of the global pandemic, our cooperation on health issues – built over 20 years of shared investments to fight HIV/AIDS – has never been more important and continues to prove that the United States and Namibia are stronger together.  Our bond will grow even stronger as we jointly combat climate change and nurture bilateral trade and other ties that will define our friendship for years to come.

Please accept my best wishes on this auspicious day.

 

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