October 21, 2021

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Montenegro Travel Advisory

23 min read

Reconsider travel to Montenegro due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Montenegro due to COVID-19.  

Montenegro has resumed most transportation options (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares).  While other improved conditions have been reported within Montenegro, local conditions are subject to change.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Montenegro.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Montenegro:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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