Monaco National Day

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States Government and the American people, I warmly congratulate the people and government of Monaco on the occasion of your 164th National Day, la Fête du Prince.

For over 150 years, the United States and Monaco have been partners and friends.  Both of our countries are deeply committed to promoting freedom, transparency, and human rights.  We have a robust economic relationship, as well as strong cultural connections.  The United States is proud of our historic ties, and in partnership with the Monegasque people and the Government of Monaco, we look forward to continuing to develop the friendship between our nations.

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