Mississippi Tax Preparer Sentenced to Prison for False IRS Returns

A Moss Point, Mississippi, resident was sentenced to 22 months in prison for preparing false tax returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst for the Southern District of Mississippi.

According to information provided to the court, Talvesha Glaude owned and operated a tax return preparation business under multiple names, including TMG Tax Service and Regional Tax Service. From 2013 through 2019, Glaude prepared tax returns for clients seeking from the IRS inflated refunds based on fraudulent dependents, federal income tax withholdings, and education credits. In addition to preparing false returns for her clients, Glaude also filed false returns for herself for the tax years 2014 through 2018.

In addition to the term of imprisonment, U.S. District Judge Halil Ozerden also ordered Glaude to serve one year of supervised release and to pay restitution to the IRS in the amount of $183,360.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman and U.S. Attorney Hurst thanked special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, who are investigating the case, and Trial Attorney Kevin Schneider of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Stan Harris, who are prosecuting this case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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