October 19, 2021

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Mexican National Day

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the people and government of the United States of America, I congratulate the Mexican government and its people as you celebrate your “Year of Independence,” including 211 years since “El Grito” and 200 years since the consummation of Mexican independence.

Our shared border, democratic values, trade, and deep cultural ties undoubtedly solidify the relations between our countries.  The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted not only our nations’ resilience, but also the strength of the ties that bind us together.

The United States’ relationship with Mexico is invaluable.  Over the last year, our nations increased trade and investment through the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement; worked together to coordinate an orderly, humane and effective regional migration system; and expanded crisis response and coordination as we addressed public health and economic crises worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic.

As our governments, civil society, and private sectors continue to work together, I am confident in our ability to build back better, and advance security and prosperity for the people of the United States and Mexico.  Please accept our congratulations on the anniversary of Mexico’s independence.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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