October 21, 2021

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Maryland Tax Preparers Sentenced to Prison for Conspiring to Defraud the IRS

11 min read
<div>Two Maryland tax return preparers were sentenced to prison for conspiring to defraud the United States and preparing false tax returns. Lenore Worthy was sentenced yesterday to six months in prison and Veronica Fortune was sentenced on Sept. 14 to 12 months and one day in prison.</div>
Two Maryland tax return preparers were sentenced to prison for conspiring to defraud the United States and preparing false tax returns. Lenore Worthy was sentenced yesterday to six months in prison and Veronica Fortune was sentenced on Sept. 14 to 12 months and one day in prison.

More from: September 23, 2021

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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