October 21, 2021

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Maryland Tax Preparer Indicted for Preparing False Returns

7 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in Greenbelt, Maryland, returned an indictment today charging an Upper Marlboro tax return preparer with conspiracy to defraud the United States and aiding and assisting in the preparation of false tax returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur.</div>

A federal grand jury in Greenbelt, Maryland, returned an indictment today charging an Upper Marlboro tax return preparer with conspiracy to defraud the United States and aiding and assisting in the preparation of false tax returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney for the District of Maryland Robert K. Hur.

According to the indictment, Anita Fortune provided tax preparation services under multiple business names, including Tax Terminatorz Inc. Fortune allegedly prepared and filed returns using co-conspirators’ electronic filing identification numbers and identifiers. In addition, Fortune allegedly provided money and office space in exchange for her co-conspirators’ electronic filing credentials. For the tax years 2012 to 2018, Fortune, along with her two co-conspirators, allegedly added fictitious or inflated itemized deductions and business losses to clients’ returns, which fraudulently reduced their tax liabilities and increased their refunds.

If convicted, Fortune faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison for the conspiracy count and three years for each false return count. Fortune also faces a period of supervised release, restitution, and monetary penalties.

An indictment merely alleges that crimes have been committed. The defendant is presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman and U.S. Attorney Hur commended special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, who conducted the investigation, and Trial Attorney Kathryn Sparks of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Leah Grossi, who are prosecuting the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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