September 27, 2021

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Malta National Day

9 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I offer congratulations to the people of Malta as you celebrate 56 years as an independent nation.

The friendship between our two peoples is long-standing and strong, with Maltese soldiers aiding the United States in its own struggle for independence over 244 years ago.  We remain steadfast partners to this day.  We stand with Malta in countering the COVID-19 pandemic, knowing both of our countries will emerge from this more resilient than before.

We look forward to building on our partnership to further advance key bilateral interests, promote shared values, and confront transnational threats.

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