Malawi National Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, it is my pleasure to congratulate the people of Malawi on the occasion of your National Day.  Our countries boast a partnership rooted in shared values and expressed through decades of close collaboration.

Now more than ever, Malawi stands as a beacon of democratic success and stability.  Malawian peacekeepers have risked their lives to help bring security and stability to conflicts across the continent.  People around the world look to Malawi as a society that has trusted, invested in, and benefited from the independence of its institutions.  Malawi will soon assume the chairmanship of the Southern African Development Community, and the region is sure to benefit from your commitment to these democratic ideals.

Today, we celebrate Malawi’s progress and its promise for the future.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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