October 21, 2021

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Long Island Resident Pleads Guilty to Multimillion-Dollar Elder Fraud Scheme

11 min read
<div>A Long Island woman pleaded guilty today to participating in a scheme to mail fraudulent prize notices that led recipients, many of whom were elderly and vulnerable, to believe that they could claim large cash prizes in exchange for a modest fee. None of the victims who submitted fees, which in total exceeded $30 million, received a substantial cash prize.</div>
A Long Island woman pleaded guilty today to participating in a scheme to mail fraudulent prize notices that led recipients, many of whom were elderly and vulnerable, to believe that they could claim large cash prizes in exchange for a modest fee. None of the victims who submitted fees, which in total exceeded $30 million, received a substantial cash prize.

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