October 21, 2021

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Lesotho Travel Advisory

19 min read

Reconsider travel to Lesotho due to COVID-19.   

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Lesotho due to COVID-19.    

Lesotho has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Lesotho. 

Read the country information page

If you decide to travel to Lesotho: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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