September 27, 2021

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Lesotho National Day

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

In commemoration of your 54th Independence Day, I send my heartfelt congratulations to the people of the Kingdom of Lesotho.

Together we seek to achieve our common goal of a stable and bright future for the citizens of Lesotho.  Our partnership on health matters has brought Lesotho ever closer to HIV/AIDS epidemic control and has supported Lesotho’s COVID-19 response.  The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) continues to deepen our economic and trade ties to the mutual benefit of both our countries.  The United States looks forward to continued partnerships in the areas of democratic governance and access to justice, and to Lesotho’s enhanced efforts to combat trafficking in persons.

As Lesotho celebrates, I wish all Basotho a prosperous, healthy, and peaceful year.

News Network

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