September 25, 2021

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Lebanon National Day

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States and the American people, I send sincere congratulations to the people of Lebanon as they celebrate their Independence Day.

Over the last seventy-seven years, Lebanon has faced many challenges, but the past year has been especially trying for the Lebanese people.  Be assured that the United States is committed to supporting the people of Lebanon, and we will continue to stand by them through these unprecedented times.

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