Laredo men receive significant sentences for trafficking $4 million of marijuana

A 35-year-old Laredo resident has been ordered to federal prison after conspiring to possess with the intent to distribute 1,261.5 kilograms of marijuana

Read full article at: https://www.justice.gov April 13, 2021

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