Justice Department Sues to Shut Down Florida Tax Return Preparers

The United States has filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida seeking to bar three Miami Gardens-area tax return preparers and their businesses and franchises, from owning or operating a tax return preparation business and preparing tax returns for others, the Justice Department announced today. The United States has simultaneously filed a request for a preliminary injunction that would immediately prohibit defendants from further preparing taxes during the pendency of the suit.

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    A Florida man was sentenced today to 21 months in prison for filing a false tax return. Jami Kopacz, of Fort Lauderdale, pleaded guilty to filing a false corporate tax return on Dec. 16, 2020. According to court documents and statements made in court, Kopacz worked as a paid escort for clients across the United States. Kopacz received payments directly from his escort clients, and from a private business for whom he worked as an independent contractor. From 2015 to 2018, Kopacz used his corporation, JK Training LLC, to receive income, and then filed false corporate tax returns (Forms 1120S) that substantially underreported the company’s gross receipts and total income.
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  • NASA, US and European Partner Satellite Returns First Sea Level Measurements
    In Space
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  • On the Passing of Former Papua New Guinean Prime Minister Morauta
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • The United States Welcomes Major Milestone in Afghanistan Peace Negotiations
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Global Entry for Colombian Citizens
    In Travel
    How to Apply for Global [Read More…]
  • Fiji Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim Announces Re-Organization of the Antitrust Division’s Civil Enforcement Program
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division announced today that it is creating the Office of Decree Enforcement and Compliance and a Civil Conduct Task Force.  Additionally, it will redistribute matters among its six civil sections in order to build expertise based on current trends in the economy.
    [Read More…]