September 22, 2021

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Justice Department Settles Sexual Harassment Lawsuit Against Property Manager and Owners of California Apartment Buildings

15 min read
<div>The Justice Department announced today that it has reached an agreement to resolve a lawsuit alleging that Filomeno Hernandez, a property manager of residential apartment buildings near MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, violated the federal Fair Housing Act by sexually harassing female tenants since at least 2006.</div>
The Justice Department announced today that it has reached an agreement to resolve a lawsuit alleging that Filomeno Hernandez, a property manager of residential apartment buildings near MacArthur Park in Los Angeles, violated the federal Fair Housing Act by sexually harassing female tenants since at least 2006.

More from: August 6, 2021

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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