October 19, 2021

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Justice Department Settles with Medical Parts Manufacturing Company to Resolve Immigration-Related Discrimination Claims

9 min read
<div>The Department of Justice announced today that it reached a settlement with DC Precision Machining Inc., which manufactures parts for medical devices and is based in Morgan Hill, California.</div>
The Department of Justice announced today that it reached a settlement with DC Precision Machining Inc., which manufactures parts for medical devices and is based in Morgan Hill, California.

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