October 26, 2021

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Justice Department Seeks to Shut Down Illinois Tax Return Preparer

6 min read
<div>The United States has filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois seeking to bar a Rockford area tax return preparer from preparing federal income tax returns for others.</div>
The United States has filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois seeking to bar a Rockford area tax return preparer from preparing federal income tax returns for others.

More from: March 17, 2021

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    In U.S GAO News
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