Justice Department Seeks to Shut Down Fraudulent Chicago-Area Tax Return Preparer

The United States has filed a complaint in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, seeking to enjoin a tax preparer from South Chicago Heights, Illinois, from preparing federal income tax returns for others.

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