October 18, 2021

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Justice Department Resolves Lawsuit Alleging Disability-Based Discrimination at 38 Multifamily Housing Complexes in North Carolina

7 min read
<div> The Justice Department announced that Mills Construction Company Inc. and several related entities have agreed to pay $275,000 to settle claims that they violated the Fair Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by failing to build 38 multifamily housing complexes in North Carolina with required accessible features for people with disabilities. As part of the settlement, the defendants also agreed to make extensive retrofits to remove accessibility barriers at the complexes.</div>
 The Justice Department announced that Mills Construction Company Inc. and several related entities have agreed to pay $275,000 to settle claims that they violated the Fair Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by failing to build 38 multifamily housing complexes in North Carolina with required accessible features for people with disabilities. As part of the settlement, the defendants also agreed to make extensive retrofits to remove accessibility barriers at the complexes.

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    In U.S GAO News
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