October 21, 2021

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Justice Department Requires Divestiture for General Shale to Proceed with Acquisition of Meridian Brick

14 min read
<div>The Department of Justice announced today that it will require General Shale Brick, Inc. (General Shale), and Meridian Brick LLC (Meridian), two of the largest suppliers of residential brick in the United States, to divest several assets used in the manufacture and sale of residential brick to preserve competition for these products in the southern and midwestern United States.</div>
The Department of Justice announced today that it will require General Shale Brick, Inc. (General Shale), and Meridian Brick LLC (Meridian), two of the largest suppliers of residential brick in the United States, to divest several assets used in the manufacture and sale of residential brick to preserve competition for these products in the southern and midwestern United States.

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