September 28, 2021

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Justice Department Reaches Agreement with Two Community Colleges to Improve Access for Students with Disabilities

8 min read
<div>The Justice Department announced today the signing of two agreements with community colleges to remove barriers experienced by students with disabilities, including veterans.</div>
The Justice Department announced today the signing of two agreements with community colleges to remove barriers experienced by students with disabilities, including veterans.

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