October 18, 2021

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Justice Department Awards Nearly $187 Million to Support Community Safety

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<div>The Department of Justice today announced that the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), a component of the department’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), has awarded almost $187 million to support state, local and tribal public safety and community justice activities. The awards, from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program, are going to all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.</div>
The Department of Justice today announced that the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), a component of the department’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP), has awarded almost $187 million to support state, local and tribal public safety and community justice activities. The awards, from the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program, are going to all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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