Joint Statement: The United States and the United Kingdom are Working Together in the Fight Against Climate Change

Office of the Spokesperson

Today in London, Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry joined meetings with Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng, and President-Designate of the 26th Conference of the Parties (COP26) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Alok Sharma.

Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry and COP26 President-Designate Alok Sharma released the following statement following their meeting.

Begin text:

We resolved today to work closely together to reduce our own emissions and to rally all countries, and most especially the world’s major economies, to strengthen climate ambition. President Biden’s upcoming Leaders Summit on Climate and the G7 leaders meeting to be hosted by the UK are both critical opportunities to build momentum on the way to COP26 in Glasgow.

Our countries are fully committed to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions no later than 2050. We urge all countries to take the steps needed to keep a 1.5 degree C temperature limit within reach, including through ambitious nationally determined contributions and long-term strategies to cut emissions and reach net zero.

We also resolved to work with other countries to help the world’s most vulnerable adapt and respond to climate impacts and to scale up finance and private investment for both mitigation and adaptation. We also look forward to working with all countries to finalize the Paris Rulebook and successfully advance wider negotiations issues. Strong progress on all of these fronts is critical to ensuring the success we need in Glasgow.

End text.

For media inquiries, please contact ClimateComms@state.gov.

 

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    A Pemberton, New Jersey, man appeared in court yesterday on a federal grand jury indictment charging him with conspiring to defraud the United States, assisting in the filing of false tax returns, obstructing the internal revenue laws, and failing to file a tax return, announced Acting Deputy Assistant Attorney General Stuart M. Goldberg of the Justice Department’s Tax Division. The Sept. 2, 2020 indictment was unsealed following the court appearance.
    [Read More…]
  • Two Individuals And Two Companies Sentenced In Scheme To Fraudulently Sell Popular Dietary Supplements
    In Crime News
    A federal court in Texas sentenced two former dietary supplement company executives to prison and ordered two companies to pay a combined $10.7 million in criminal forfeiture for their roles in fraudulently selling popular workout supplements, the Justice Department announced today.
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  • G7 Foreign Ministers’ Statement on Arrest and Detention of Alexey Navalny
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Member of Neo-Nazi Group Sentenced for Plot to Target Journalists and Advocates
    In Crime News
    Johnny Roman Garza, 21, a member of the Neo-Nazi group Atomwaffen Division, was sentenced today to 16 months in prison and three years of supervised release for his role in a plot to threaten and intimidate journalists and advocates who worked to expose anti-Semitism.
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  • Mauritius Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • Under Secretary Hale’s Call with Moldovan President-Elect Sandu
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Retirement Security: Older Women Report Facing a Financially Uncertain Future
    In U.S GAO News
    In all 14 focus groups GAO held with older women, women described some level of anxiety about financial security in retirement. Many expressed concerns about the future of Social Security and Medicare benefits, and the costs of health care and housing. Women in the groups also cited a range of experiences that hindered their retirement security, such as divorce or leaving the workforce before they planned to (see fig.). Women in all 14 focus groups said their lack of personal finance education negatively affected their ability to plan for retirement. Many shared ideas about personal finance education including the view that it should be incorporated into school curriculum starting in kindergarten and continuing through college, and should be available through all phases of life. Women Age 70 and Over by Marital Status Note: Percentages do not add up to 100 percent due to rounding Individual women's financial security is also linked to their household where resources may be shared among household members. According to the 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances, among households with older women, about 23 percent of those with white respondents and 40 percent of those with African American respondents fell short of a measure of retirement confidence, indicating their income was not sufficient to maintain their standard of living. The likelihood of a household reporting high retirement confidence rose in certain cases. For example among households of similar wealth, those with greater liquidity in their portfolio and those with defined benefit plan income were more likely to report high retirement confidence. This testimony summarizes the information contained in GAO's July 2020 report, entitled Retirement Security: Older Women Report Facing a Financially Uncertain Future (GAO-20-435). For more information, contact Tranchau Nguyen at (202) 512-2660 or NguyenTT@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Australian Foreign Minister Payne
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Escalation of Violence between Armenia and Azerbaijan
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Morgan Ortagus, [Read More…]
  • Ex-law enforcement officer sent to prison for transporting purported drug money
    In Justice News
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  • This Week in Iran Policy
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Department Press Briefing – February 5, 2021
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]
  • Condemning the Assassination of Abdul Wase Ghafari
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Egypt Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • District Court Orders Washington State Company and its Owner to Stop Distributing Adulterated Juice Products
    In Crime News
    A federal court permanently enjoined a Sunnyside, Washington, company from preparing, processing, and distributing adulterated juice and other food products, the Department of Justice announced today.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken With Yang Man-Hee of Seoul Broadcasting System
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • FY 2021 Local Jail Reporting Program (LJRP) Pilot Test
    In Justice News
    (Solicitation)
    The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) is seeking applications for funding for the FY 2021 Local Jail Reporting Program Pilot Test. This pilot test will collect individual-level administrative record data from 10 large jails. The information collected will include jail admissions and releases, demographic characteristics of inmates, charges and dispositions, and sentences.
    Grants.gov Application Deadline: 11:59 p.m. eastern time on June 14, 2021; JustGrants Application Deadline: 11:59 p.m. eastern time on June 28, 2021 [Read More…]
  • PRC Military Pressure Against Taiwan Threatens Regional Peace and Stability
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ned Price, Department [Read More…]