October 26, 2021

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Joint Statement on the Japan-United States Strategic Energy Partnership (JUSEP)

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Office of the Spokesperson

The text of the following statement was released by the Governments of the United States of America and Japan on the occasion of the Japan-United States Strategic Energy Partnership (JUSEP).

Begin Text:

Japan and the United States reaffirmed their joint commitment to maintaining open and competitive energy markets and strengthening energy security in the Indo-Pacific region at a virtual Japan-United States Strategic Energy Partnership (JUSEP) meeting on September 24 (EST)/25 (JST), 2020.  Both sides praised this year’s JUSEP achievements and recognized the importance of ongoing bilateral energy cooperation with an emphasis on LNG and emerging energy technology.  In addition, while working to mitigate the global effects of COVID-19, each country highlighted the progress of U.S.-Japan joint projects and discussed the importance of continued commercial engagement. The two governments also reviewed progress under the Japan-U.S.-Mekong Power Partnership (JUMPP) to strengthen Mekong power sectors, detailed in the Japan-U.S. Joint Ministerial Statement on JUMPP released on September 8, 2020 and Mekong-U.S. Partnership Joint Ministerial Statement released on the occasion of the First Mekong-U.S. Partnership Ministerial Meeting on September 11, 2020. Looking to the future, the United States and Japan discussed plans to hold a public-private event in the Indo-Pacific region in the coming months, and to further develop JUSEP to include a wider range of energy technology.

End Text.

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