October 19, 2021

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Joint Statement on the C5+1 Ministerial during UNGA 76

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Office of the Spokesperson

The text of the following statement was released by the Governments of the United States of America, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and the Republic of Uzbekistan on the occasion of the C5+1 Ministerial on the margins of UNGA 76.

Begin text: 

The U.S. Secretary of State and the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and the Republic of Uzbekistan met in a hybrid virtual and in-person C5+1 format September 22, 2021.

Participants celebrated the thirty-year anniversaries of the Central Asian countries’ independence and establishment of bilateral relations with the United States.  They also reiterated the importance of the C5+1 regional diplomatic platform, noting its utility in facilitating critical conversations throughout 2021 regarding coordination on Afghanistan, COVID-19, economic connectivity, and the climate crisis.

At this September 22 ministerial dialogue held during UNGA, participants discussed the C5+1’s response to the evolving security, economic, and humanitarian challenges in Central Asia and surrounding regions.  Regarding Afghanistan, participants affirmed the importance of mitigating a potential humanitarian crisis and calling on the Taliban to counter terrorism, allow safe passage for foreign citizens and Afghans who want to leave, and form an inclusive government that respects basic rights.  Participants also affirmed the importance of continued C5+1 support for the people of Afghanistan, utilizing the potential of Central Asia and its domestically produced goods for joint coordinated efforts in providing humanitarian assistance and ensuring food security.  Participants reaffirmed their commitment to addressing these issues collectively, and in a manner that supports the continued independence, sovereignty, and territorial integrity of the C5.

End text.

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