September 27, 2021

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Iranian National Charged with Illegally Exporting Laboratory Equipment to Iran

8 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment today charging a Canadian national with the unlawful export of laboratory equipment from the United States to Iran, through Canada and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).</div>
A federal grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment today charging a Canadian national with the unlawful export of laboratory equipment from the United States to Iran, through Canada and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

More from: July 30, 2021

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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