October 19, 2021

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Indictment Unsealed Against Six Individuals and Foreign Financial Service Firm for Tax Evasion Conspiracy

17 min read
<div>An indictment was unsealed today in New York, New York, that charges offshore financial service executives and a Swiss financial services company with conspiracy to defraud the IRS by helping three large-value U.S. taxpayer-clients conceal more than $60 million in income and assets held in undeclared, offshore bank accounts and to evade U.S. income taxes.</div>
An indictment was unsealed today in New York, New York, that charges offshore financial service executives and a Swiss financial services company with conspiracy to defraud the IRS by helping three large-value U.S. taxpayer-clients conceal more than $60 million in income and assets held in undeclared, offshore bank accounts and to evade U.S. income taxes.

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