September 22, 2021

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High-Level Dialogue on Climate Action in the Americas

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Office of the Spokesperson

The United States will join the High-Level Dialogue on Climate Action in the Americas, hosted by the Government of Argentina, on September 8, 2021.  The one-day virtual event will bring together countries in the Americas to discuss our shared commitment to enhancing climate ambition.  Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry will provide remarks during the high-level opening segment of the dialogue along with Latin American and Caribbean heads of state, the UN Secretary General, and other special guests.

The dialogue will build further momentum for climate action ahead of the 26th UN Climate Change Conference (COP26), which will be held October 31 to November 12, 2021, in Glasgow, United Kingdom.  The event is being co-organized by the Governments of Argentina, Barbados, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, and Panama, and will include interventions from governments, the private and financial sectors, development banks, academia, and civil society organizations.  The dialogue will include panel discussions on topics including enhancing climate ambition on the road to Glasgow, accelerating climate action through regional cooperation, and strengthening adaptation and resilience to the impacts of climate change.

The event will be broadcast live and is open to the public at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLoS47z2FoU&feature=youtu.be.

For media inquiries, please contact ClimateComms@state.gov.

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