Helicopter Crash in Egypt

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

We mourn the terrible loss of five American soldiers who died yesterday in service of our country as a part of the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) in Egypt.  Our great men and women in uniform put their lives on the line every day for our nation and for the sake of securing peace throughout the world.  Alongside our servicemen, we also are saddened to learn of the deaths of one French and one Czech soldier.  We pray for all of their families and for the quick recovery of the one injured American soldier who survived.  May God bless our nation and these patriots.

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