Former Owners of Telemarketing Company Agree to Pay At Least $4 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations

Two Florida men have agreed collectively to pay at least $4 million to resolve allegations that they violated the False Claims Act by engaging in schemes to generate prescriptions for compounded drugs and refer those prescriptions to pharmacies in exchange for illegal kickbacks. Many of those prescriptions were billed to TRICARE, the federal health care program providing insurance for active duty military personnel, military retirees, and military dependents.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In Crime News
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    In U.S GAO News
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