October 19, 2021

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Former Elected County Coroner Indicted for Illegal Distribution of Controlled Substances

17 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Kentucky returned an indictment today charging a former elected county coroner with illegally distributing controlled substances such as oxycodone and OxyContin. </div>
A federal grand jury in the Eastern District of Kentucky returned an indictment today charging a former elected county coroner with illegally distributing controlled substances such as oxycodone and OxyContin. 

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