October 19, 2021

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Florida Man Pleads Guilty to Federal Charges for Fraudulently Obtaining and Laundering More than $4 Million in Paycheck Protection Program Loans

13 min read
<div>A Florida man pleaded guilty today in the District of New Jersey to fraudulently obtaining more than $4.6 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, and subsequently laundering the loan proceeds through a series of illicit financial transactions.</div>
A Florida man pleaded guilty today in the District of New Jersey to fraudulently obtaining more than $4.6 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans guaranteed by the Small Business Administration under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, and subsequently laundering the loan proceeds through a series of illicit financial transactions.

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