Final Adoption of the U.S. Universal Periodic Review

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Today, the UN Human Rights Council adopted the report of the third Universal Periodic Review (UPR) for the United States.  All UN member states participate in the UPR process, which is designed to ensure that every nation is subject to scrutiny of its human rights record.

When President Biden made clear his intent to reengage with the world, he did so with confidence in our diplomatic capacity, the strength of our partnerships and alliances, and the power of our example.  That example remains among our greatest strengths, and it is our charge to make it even stronger in the years ahead.

Last month, I spoke directly to the members of the Human Rights Council to announce the intent of the United States to return to that body and seek election to its membership.  In those comments, I underscored our longstanding commitment to defending freedom, championing opportunity, upholding human rights, respecting the rule of law, and treating every person with dignity.

But leadership on human rights goes far beyond merely reminding other countries of their obligations and commitments, pointing out failures, and registering our displeasure.  It involves leading by example, acknowledging our shortcomings, and striving to live up to our highest ideals and principles.  In completing its Periodic Review, the United States demonstrates its commitment to openness, transparency, and self-reflection, and a return to leadership with confidence, respect, and humility.

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