September 28, 2021

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FBI Employee Indicted for Illegally Removing National Security Documents, Taking Material to Her Home

14 min read
<div>An employee of the FBI’s Kansas City Division has been indicted by a federal grand jury for illegally removing numerous national security documents that were found in her home.</div>
An employee of the FBI’s Kansas City Division has been indicted by a federal grand jury for illegally removing numerous national security documents that were found in her home.

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