October 21, 2021

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Equatorial Guinea National Day

15 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I extend congratulations to all Equatoguineans on the 53rd anniversary of your independence.

The United States values our relationship with Equatorial Guinea, and we are committed to our partnership that is working to end the COVID-19 pandemic and recover from its impact, combat trafficking in persons, and promote maritime security and economic growth.  In the coming year, we will continue to support Equatoguinean efforts to improve democratic governance and respect for human rights and strengthen our economic ties.

As you celebrate another year of independence, we send our wishes for a peaceful and prosperous year.

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