October 21, 2021

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Duff to Retire as Administrative Office Director; Judge Mauskopf Named as Successor

8 min read
<div>James C. Duff has announced he will retire as the director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts on Jan. 31. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., has appointed Chief Judge Roslynn R. Mauskopf, of the Eastern District of New York, as his successor, effective Feb. 1.</div>

James C. Duff has announced he will retire as the director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts on Jan. 31. Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., has appointed Chief Judge Roslynn R. Mauskopf, of the Eastern District of New York, as his successor, effective Feb. 1. She will be the 11th director since the AO was established in 1939 and the first woman to hold the position. Duff served as director from 2006 to 2011 and since 2015.

Mauskopf has served as a district judge since 2007. She previously served as the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, New York state inspector general, and as an assistant district attorney in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office.

The director is the chief administrative officer of the federal courts and serves under the direction of the Judicial Conference of the United States, the principal policymaking body for the federal court system.

Read the press release from the U.S. Supreme Court.

More from: info@uscourts.gov

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