October 21, 2021

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Djibouti National Day

14 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Djibouti as you celebrate the 44th anniversary of your nation’s independence.

The United States and Djibouti are partners in fostering security, stability, and peace in the Horn of Africa.  We commend Djibouti’s leadership in the region, from its hosting the Executive Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development to its contributions to the African Union Mission in Somalia, and the important mediating role it plays.

We will continue to work with the government and the people of Djibouti to strengthen democratic institutions, expand economic opportunities, and advance our common interests.

 

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