October 18, 2021

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Director of the Procurement Collusion Strike Force Daniel Glad Delivers Remarks at ABA Section of Public Contract Law’s Public Procurement Symposium

14 min read
<div>Thank you for the kind introduction, and good morning, everyone. It’s a pleasure to be joining you virtually, though like many of you—I wish we could be together in person. I appreciate the invitation to speak with you today at the Public Procurement Symposium. Each year, the Symposium explores issues relevant to federal, state, and local government contracting, drawing insights from colleagues at the forefront of the procurement industry.</div>
Thank you for the kind introduction, and good morning, everyone. It’s a pleasure to be joining you virtually, though like many of you—I wish we could be together in person. I appreciate the invitation to speak with you today at the Public Procurement Symposium. Each year, the Symposium explores issues relevant to federal, state, and local government contracting, drawing insights from colleagues at the forefront of the procurement industry.

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