October 18, 2021

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Designation of Al-Qa’ida Supporters

10 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States remains committed to combatting al-Qa’ida and other terrorist groups around the world, including by countering their financing. Today, the United States imposed sanctions against five al-Qa’ida supporters operating in Turkey who provided financial and logistical support to the group. These designations are being taken pursuant to Executive Order 13224, as amended.

The United States will continue to work closely with our partners and allies, including Turkey, in identifying, exposing, and disrupting al-Qa’ida’s financial support networks. We will keep a vigilant eye on these networks to deter them from abusing the international financial system to generate revenues for terrorist operations.

The United States will never forget the victims of the September 11, 2001 attacks and al-Qa’ida’s other plots around the world. We will continue to target those who seek to inflict harm on the United States, our citizens, and our interests.

For more information on today’s action, please see the Department of the Treasury’s press release.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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