October 18, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Trip to Switzerland, Uzbekistan, India, and Pakistan 

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Office of the Spokesperson

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman will travel to Geneva, Switzerland on September 29 to lead a U.S. interagency delegation to a September 30 U.S.-Russia bilateral Strategic Stability Dialogue.  She will be joined by Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Bonnie Jenkins.  The two delegations last met in Geneva on July 28.  The Strategic Stability Dialogue follows from a commitment made by President Biden and Russian President Putin in their June 2021 Geneva meeting to have a deliberate and robust dialogue that will seek to lay the groundwork for future arms control and risk reduction measures.  Deputy Secretary Sherman will also travel to Bern to inaugurate the first U.S.-Swiss Strategic Partnership Dialogue with Swiss State Secretary Livia Leu.

She will then travel to Tashkent, Uzbekistan where she will meet with senior officials and civil society on October 4.  Deputy Secretary Sherman will be in New Delhi, India on October 6 for a series of bilateral meetings, civil society events, and the India Ideas Summit.  On October 7, she will travel to Mumbai, India for engagements with business and civil society.  Deputy Secretary Sherman will complete her trip by traveling to Islamabad, Pakistan on October 7-8 to meet with senior officials.

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