Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Travel to the People’s Republic of China and Oman

Office of the Spokesperson

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy R. Sherman will travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) July 25-26 and to Oman July 27.

In the PRC, the Deputy Secretary will travel to Tianjin to meet with PRC officials, including State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi.  These discussions are part of ongoing U.S. efforts to hold candid exchanges with PRC officials to advance U.S. interests and values and to responsibly manage the relationship. The Deputy Secretary will discuss areas where we have serious concerns about PRC actions, as well as areas where our interests align.

In Oman, the Deputy Secretary will meet with Deputy Foreign Minister Sheikh Khalifa Al Harthy to discuss advancing peace and security in the region and our shared commitment to bolstering the U.S.- Oman bilateral relationship.

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    In Crime News
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    In Crime News
    Today, Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey B. Wall issued the following statement on the passing of former Solicitor General Drew S. Days III:
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