October 18, 2021

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Kamilov

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman met today in Tashkent with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Abdulaziz Kamilov and an interagency delegation that included National Security Advisor Viktor Makhmudov, Minister of Justice Ruslanbek Davlatov, and Special Representative of the President of Uzbekistan for Afghanistan Ismatullah Irgashev.  The Deputy Secretary congratulated Foreign Minister Kamilov and the Uzbek people on Uzbekistan’s 30th year of independence and thanked them for Uzbekistan’s constructive engagement on Afghanistan.  The Deputy Secretary and Minister Kamilov discussed their joint efforts to combat COVID-19 through vaccine distribution.  The Deputy Secretary reaffirmed the importance of the U.S.-Uzbekistan strategic partnership and welcomed Uzbekistan’s leadership on regional and transnational issues through the C5+1 format, including its commitment to set ambitious targets to lower greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.  Deputy Secretary Sherman stressed the importance of continued progress on democratic reforms and promoting respect for human rights as Uzbekistan pursues its reform agenda.  Deputy Secretary Sherman thanked Foreign Minister Kamilov and the interagency delegation for Uzbekistan’s continued partnership.

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