Deputy Secretary Biegun’s Meetings with Republic of Korea First Vice Foreign Minister Choi and Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lee

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Deputy Secretary of State and Special Representative for North Korea Stephen E. Biegun met today in Seoul with Republic of Korea (ROK) First Vice Foreign Minister Choi Jong-kun and Special Representative for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security Affairs Lee Do-hoon. The Deputy Secretary reaffirmed our commitment to the U.S.-ROK Alliance and expressed appreciation for the ROK’s continued coordination on the COVID-19 response. Deputy Secretary Biegun also reaffirmed U.S. support for inter-Korean cooperation, and continued U.S. readiness to engage in meaningful dialogue with the DPRK in the pursuit of complete denuclearization. The Deputy Secretary encouraged continued cooperation with Japan to promote regional security and a free and open Indo-Pacific.

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