Deputy Secretary Biegun’s Meeting with the Bosnia and Herzegovina Presidency

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Deputy Secretary of State Stephen E. Biegun met virtually today with the three members of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Presidency, Milorad Dodik, Željko Komšić, and Šefik Džaferović. The Deputy Secretary and the members of the Presidency commemorated the 25th anniversary of the Dayton Peace Accords, initialed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, that ended the devastating war in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Deputy Secretary Biegun and the members of the Presidency also discussed cooperation to ensure peace and stability in the Western Balkans, which has been supported by more than $2 billion in U.S. assistance provided to Bosnia and Herzegovina since the Dayton Peace Accords, including over $4 million in COVID-19 assistance.

The Deputy Secretary urged the Presidency to fully realize the promise of peace by enacting the governance reforms necessary to enable Bosnia and Herzegovina to achieve Euro-Atlantic integration.  He underscored that the United States deeply values its longstanding partnership with Bosnia and Herzegovina; supports its sovereignty and territorial integrity; and continues to stand as a steadfast partner committed to our shared goal of a democratic, inclusive, and prosperous Bosnia and Herzegovina on the path to full Euro-Atlantic integration.  Finally, Deputy Secretary Biegun and the members of the Presidency agreed that the people of Bosnia and Herzegovina deserve lasting stability, effective governance, and accountable leaders who work together to ensure economic opportunities for all.

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    A civilian employee working for the U.S. Marine Corps Community Association pleaded guilty today to assaulting his spouse while working in Iwakuni, Japan.
    [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Settles Lawsuit Against Owners and Mangers of Housing Properties in Honolulu, Hawaii for Discriminating Against Families with Children
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced today that it has reached a settlement with the owners and managers of housing in Honolulu, Hawaii, to resolve a lawsuit filed last year alleging that the defendants refused to rent to families with children at properties they owned and managed, in violation of the Fair Housing Act.
    [Read More…]
  • Iran Threatening to Expel UN Investigators
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]