Deputy Secretary Biegun’s Call with Minister Kyaw Tin of Burma

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

As part of the United States’ ongoing and high-level engagement with the leaders and people of Burma, Deputy Secretary of State Stephen R. Biegun spoke with Union Minister for International Cooperation Kyaw Tin of Burma to express support for the country’s ongoing democratic transition and the advancement of peace and national reconciliation, respect for human rights, and inclusive economic development.

Deputy Secretary Biegun and Minister Kyaw Tin also discussed efforts to address ongoing violence, humanitarian, and human rights concerns, including those affecting the Rohingya, while strengthening economic ties and deepening our long-standing partnership with Burma.

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